Devenir membre
Devenir Membre

ou
Continuer avec Google
Connexion
Se connecter

ou
Se connecter avec Google

Sujet Post super intéressant sur le mixage numérique

  • 10 réponses
  • 3 participants
  • 748 vues
  • 1 follower
Pov Gabou

Pov Gabou

19742 posts au compteur
Drogué à l'AFéine
Premier post
1 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 19:24:12

Citation :
Indeed. This is a fundamental fact and there's no way around it. If you
have two arbitrary full-scale signals, you cannot in general represent
their sum without adding an extra bit. You have to scale both sounds down
by half, or the sum can clip. Moreover, the when you add n channels,
you'll have to divide by n or add lb(n) bits, so the more you mix, the
more difficult it all becomes.

In practice we either work in a higher resolution or divide by a number
between 1 and n. IIRC, n statistically independent signals tend to sum to
no more than sqrt(n) RMS, under fairly general conditions, so that's
sometimes used. But especially with heavily processed and synthesized
sounds those conditions do not always hold, and clipping can occur.

IMHO, the real problem with mixing has little to do with the technology,
and a lot to do with people's attitudes. I mean, you can't reliably and
accurately mix two n-bit signals into an n-bit result, so we have to ask,
why would people want to fight this fact? I see two answers.

First, eversince the earliest audio transports we've had to deal with
limited dynamic range. There has always been a tradeoff between dynamic
headroom and noise. That applies to CD's as well -- 16 bits isn't enough
to cover the dynamic range of human hearing. So people have grown to treat
dynamic range as a scarcity. When we mix sounds, we always try to start
with full-range signals, and always aim at a full-range one at identical
bit width. But nowadays that's just stupid. 24 bits *does* cover what we
can hear, and it's cheap enough to go to higher intermediate and final
resolutions.

Really the only factual basis for the full-scale fetish is the fact that
our mic/A/D chains remain noisy. But that should always be compensated for
by varying microphone gain and placing the extra accuracy further down the
sample. Not by making all signals full-scale. People need to understand
that, in today's high resolution DSP environments, it's perfectly
permissible to use an input chain accurate to 14-18 bits to produce 24-bit
signals with lots of dynamic headroom. Those can then be mixed at will,
without attenuation or fear of overflow.

Secondly, relativism isn't too good when it comes to dynamics. Most people
have grown to expect that there's always a volume knob, somewhere, and
that it's alright to touch it. This means that almost all music is
produced in relative amplitude, not absolute. This is bad because it
tempts people to treat volume and dynamic range as arbitrary quantities
which can be varied at will. For instance, when we archive an acoustic
guitar track, we rarely record the absolute amplitude of the take in any
way. Consequently, when we mix it, we often unintentionally end up with an
unrealistic guitar sound -- acoustic instruments respond very differently
depending on how loud they're played. Loudness maximization and the
resulting zero dynamic range are another problem enabled by relative
amplitude.

So what does this have to do with mixing? A lot, because when we get used
to relative amplitude, this contributes to the full-scale fetish. I mean,
if amplitudes are going to be tampered with anyway, why *not* make the
signals full-scale, and make do with fewer bits? Why not even compress
them a bit, because that lessens audible noise, listening to the
full-scale signal...

I advocate a mixing style where we aim at a) enough S/N on the input side
so that amplification of some 6-10dB won't bring in audible noise, b)
enough headroom to accommodate enough of the extra bits produced by a
typical processing chain, c) signal chains which are calibrated in
absolute amplitude as far as possible and d) uniform transport and storage
bit widths wide enough cover the dynamic range of human hearing,
accounting for a) and b). I believe all audio production should first aim
at an absolute, ideal level of reproduction, and only then consider things
like compression for limited range transports, mastering, maximization,
typical user responses, and the like.

When we do it this way, we'll always have enough headroom to mix arbitrary
numbers of signals -- if we don't, we'll already have forced the resulting
SPL's beyond the pain threshold. We'll have significantly fewer noise
problems as well, because we're avoiding them early on. And we also tend
to treat amplification and dynamic processing as first rate effects, which
is what they really are -- an amplified guitar isn't the same thing as a
guitar played louder, and premature compression usually amounts to a
wholesale slaughter of dynamics. To hear the difference, go to a good
movie theatre (cinematic audio works in absolute amplitude), pick a high
profile movie with a composed soundtrack and an all-digital production
team, and enjoy. You'll hear sound that is far more open, less fatiguing
and better balanced than your run-of-the-mill pop album. The same goes for
the very best pop and classical albums as well, as you'll see from the
recommendations of the top mastering engineers and radio technicians, but
there relative amplitude is still a bit of a problem.



C'est pas de moi, c'est en anglais (si vraiment ça interesse des gens, je peux le traduire), et ça concerne le mixage numérique.

C'est de Sempo Syreni, un gars d'Heslinky, dont le site est là

http://www.helsinki.fi/~ssyreeni/index.html
Ellance

Ellance

568 posts au compteur
Posteur AFfolé
2 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 20:40:17
Ellance

Ellance

568 posts au compteur
Posteur AFfolé
3 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 20:40:27
Gabou,
Je suis plutôt pas mauvais en anglais mais là je vois pas du tout la finalité de son discours, qu'as-tu compris ?
Pov Gabou

Pov Gabou

19742 posts au compteur
Drogué à l'AFéine
4 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 20:48:10
Ben c'était vis à vis des problèmes de mixage, de quantification, de reserve au niveau dynamique.

En relation avec les posts sur la normalisation, etc...
2d

2d

6080 posts au compteur
Je poste, donc je suis
5 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 20:51:53
Flag. Je lirai ca a tête reposée

Ellance

Ellance

568 posts au compteur
Posteur AFfolé
6 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 21:09:24
Ouais bon, c'est un peu comme s'il expliquait à un réal. de cinema que la lumière naturelle est magnifique est que les projecteurs ne servent à rien... En plus je ne crois qu'on enregistre une ballade folk en jouant de la 12 cordes comme un bourrin !
le 24 bits est un dégradé de couleur qui dans notre cas est la dynamique et le grand intérêt du 32 bits est de pouvoir effectuer les traitements les moins destructifs possibles....
Sa comparaison avec un orchestre classique me gène beaucoup également, car trouver un équilibre "naturel" dans l'enregistrement d'un groupe de rock reste un process artificiel contrairerement à celui qui existe dans un philarmonique....
Question : quel est le niveau relatif d'une SG sur trois corps Marshall !!
Bon, que faire ? Enregistrer une guitare basse sur 8 bits a son niveau dans le mix final ?
Si notre ami c'est faire ça et enregistrer 40 pistes direct au bon niveau, c'est est capable de régler effectivement tout son mix en amont, chapeau !
Non, je dirais simplement que l'intérêt d'enregistrer en collant au 0 dB et d'avoir à éviter de normaliser pour éviter une nouvelle génération numérique...
Bon , j'ai peut être rater un truc plus subtil, n'hésites pas à me reprendre...
Pov Gabou

Pov Gabou

19742 posts au compteur
Drogué à l'AFéine
7 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 21:14:43

Citation :
Ouais bon, c'est un peu comme s'il expliquait à un réal. de cinema que la lumière naturelle est magnifique est que les projecteurs ne servent à rien...



Oui, tant que tu veux pas profiter de l'effet des projecteurs... C'est ce qu'il précise là :

Citation :
And we also tend
to treat amplification and dynamic processing as first rate effects, which
is what they really are -- an amplified guitar isn't the same thing as a
guitar played louder, and premature compression usually amounts to a
wholesale slaughter of dynamics.



Citation :
le 24 bits est un dégradé de couleur qui dans notre cas est la dynamique et le grand intérêt du 32 bits est de pouvoir effectuer les traitements les moins destructifs possibles....



Oui, mais justement, c'est ce qu'il dit : pas besoin de plus (au fait, le 24 dont il parle et dont tu parles est plus précis que le 32 bits dont tu parles... Différence entre représentation à virgule fixe et virgule flottante).

Citation :
Bon, que faire ? Enregistrer une guitare basse sur 8 bits a son niveau dans le mix final ?



Si tu enregistres en 24 bits, pour avoir que 8 bits de résolution sur la guitare, il faut qu'elle soit (calcul très grossier) à 16*6 dB en dessous, soit 96 dB au dessous du niveau nominal. On ets d'accord pour dire que 8 bits pour une guitare à - 96 dB, c'est suffisant, non ? ;)

Citation :
Non, je dirais simplement que l'intérêt d'enregistrer en collant au 0 dB et d'avoir à éviter de normaliser pour éviter une nouvelle génération numérique...



Euh, oui, justement, il explique pourquoi ça sert à rien d'appliquer ce raisonnement ! (cf au dessus pour l'explication).
Ellance

Ellance

568 posts au compteur
Posteur AFfolé
8 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 21:25:30
Sur ce dernier point, je penses préferer avoir toutes les options au mix et un niveau "pré-normalisé". Néanmoins, la dynamique continue à s'appliquer quel que soit le niveau, non ?
Cela dit, je m'interroge régulièrement sur l'idée de baisser celle-ci selon les instruments : une rythmique saturée mérite t'elle réellement du 24 bits ? Est -ce un avantage sur le temps d'attaque des compresseurs et la finesse du déclenchement de ceux-ci ?
Je manque un peu d'expérience à ce sujet...
Pov Gabou

Pov Gabou

19742 posts au compteur
Drogué à l'AFéine
9 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 21:31:51

Citation :
Néanmoins, la dynamique continue à s'appliquer quel que soit le niveau, non ?



Le problème, dans ce cas là, c'est que l'on confond souvent signal / bruit et dynamique.

Citation :
Cela dit, je m'interroge régulièrement sur l'idée de baisser celle-ci selon les instruments : une rythmique saturée mérite t'elle réellement du 24 bits ? Est -ce un avantage sur le temps d'attaque des compresseurs et la finesse du déclenchement de ceux-ci ?
Je manque un peu d'expérience à ce sujet...



Mériter, j'en sais rien, j'ai aucune expérience en ce domaine. Mais le but est de capter le plus fidèlement possible ton truc de départ, ouais. Je vois pas le rapport avec le compresseur ? (à la limite, c'est la fréquence d'échantillonnage qui a un rapport, mais assez lointain quand même).
Ellance

Ellance

568 posts au compteur
Posteur AFfolé
10 Posté le 06/10/2003 à 21:38:13
Ben, pour faire simple, le nombre de bits va définir le nombre de pas de niveaux, l'"escalier numérique étant beaucoup plus fin, tu vas déclencher la réaction du compresseur sur des infos plus petites...
La fréquence de sampling elle, joue sur la finesse des variations de fréquences enregistrées...
cookies
Nous utilisons les cookies !

Oui, Audiofanzine utilise des cookies. Et comme la dernière chose que nous voudrions serait de perturber votre alimentation avec des choses trop grasses ou trop sucrées, sachez que ces derniers sont fait maison avec des produits frais, bio, équitables et dans des justes proportions nutritives.
Ce que cela veut dire, c’est que les infos que nous y stockons ne visent qu’à simplifier votre usage du site comme à améliorer votre expérience sur nos pages (en savoir plus).

Nous tenons à préciser qu’Audiofanzine n’a pas attendu qu’une loi nous y oblige pour respecter la vie privée de nos membres et visiteurs. Les cookies que nous utilisons ont en commun leur unique objectif qui est d’améliorer votre expérience utilisateur.

Tous nos cookies
Cookies non soumis à consentement
Il s'agit de cookies qui garantissent le bon fonctionnement du site Audiofanzine. Le site Web ne peut pas fonctionner correctement sans ces cookies. Exemples : cookies vous permettant de rester connecté de page en page ou de personnaliser votre utilisation du site (mode sombre ou filtres).
Google Analytics
Nous utilisons Google Analytics afin de mieux comprendre l’utilisation que nos visiteurs font de notre site pour tenter de l’améliorer.
Publicités
Ces informations nous permettent de vous afficher des publicités qui vous concernent grâce auxquelles Audiofanzine est financé. En décochant cette case vous aurez toujours des publicités mais elles risquent d’être moins intéressantes :) Nous utilisons Google Ad Manager pour diffuser une partie des publicités, des mécanismes intégrés à notre CMS pour le reste.

Nous tenons à préciser qu’Audiofanzine n’a pas attendu qu’une loi nous y oblige pour respecter la vie privée de nos membres et visiteurs. Les cookies que nous utilisons ont en commun leur unique objectif qui est d’améliorer votre expérience utilisateur.

Tous nos cookies
Cookies non soumis à consentement

Il s’agit de cookies qui garantissent le bon fonctionnement du site Audiofanzine. Le site Web ne peut pas fonctionner correctement sans ces cookies. Exemples : cookies vous permettant de rester connecté de page en page ou de personnaliser votre utilisation du site (mode sombre ou filtres).

Google Analytics

Nous utilisons Google Analytics afin de mieux comprendre l’utilisation que nos visiteurs font de notre site pour tenter de l’améliorer. Lorsque ce paramètre est activé, aucune information personnelle n’est envoyé à Google et les adresses IP sont anonymisées.

Publicités

Ces informations nous permettent de vous afficher des publicités qui vous concernent grâce auxquelles Audiofanzine est financé. En décochant cette case vous aurez toujours des publicités mais elles risquent d’être moins intéressantes :) Nous utilisons Google Ad Manager pour diffuser une partie des publicités, des mécanismes intégrés à notre CMS pour le reste.


Vous pouvez trouver plus de détails sur la proctection des données dans la politique de confidentialité.
Vous trouverez également des informations sur la manière dont Google utilise les données à caractère personnel en suivant ce lien.